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EACH MONTH WE WILL INTRODUCE YOU TO A NEW OCEAN ARTISAN THAT IS INSPIRING OTHERS WITH THEIR OCEAN ARTWORK. AT THE END OF THE MONTH WE WILL RAFFLE OFF ONE OF THEIR DONATED PIECES TO HELP SUPPORT OWO INITIATIVES. This month we bring you our next OWO Ocean Artisan, and SoCal native, Donald Miralle. For the last twenty years, Donald has worked as a professional photographer for clients such as Outside, National Geographic, Men’s Journal, and Sports Illustrated. Donald has photographed everything from the depths of our seas to our world’s best athletes. In fact, Donald is a bit of an athlete himself...

THIS MONTH WE ARE KICKING OFF A NEW INITIATIVE THAT WILL HIGHLIGHT AND SUPPORT THE AMAZING WORK OF OCEAN-MINDED ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD. We hope you’ll join us in welcoming our first OWO Ocean Artisan, Bree Brooks  Bree Brooks grew up under the sun-drenched Hawaiian skies and has been traveling the world since she was nineteen years old. Having lived abroad and journeyed across Southeast Asia, Europe and the South Pacific, Bree’s vibrant hand painted works have been inspired by the various colors of the environments in which she has explored.  Although Bree’s work has been inspired by her travels, she has been practicing art in one form or another since she was a child. Whilst working as a surf instructor in Sri Lanka, Bree suffered an injury and found herself stuck on dry land for many months. During that time she began experimenting with paints and creating images of surf breaks....

I felt nauseated staring down through the choppy surface into the turquoise water column. For many of us, the idea of exploring the ocean might sound like something we are capable of, however grand ideas tend to feel more doable in the safety blanket of our minds than in actual reality. So, when push came to shove, an internal conflict began to brew within me. ...

When Taylor Steele started using punk rock to soundtrack his films, the relationship between surfing and punk rock became common vernacular for anyone growing up near the beach in California. For those familiar with either surfing or punk rock, the parallels are obvious. For one, both are visceral and adrenaline-inducing experiences; surfing possesses an inherent connection to nature’s formidable power that mimics punk’s rage channeled into musical form.   The rush of getting pounded in heavy surf is the physical equivalent to the sonic experience of hearing a snare get smashed so hard that the drum head breaks. Perhaps more significant though is the similarity in lifestyle that both surfing and punk rock entail. From an outside perspective, surfers are kind of an odd bunch.   Surfing is largely a lonely and selfish activity, where there are no rules and lineups are dictated by caveman-like pecking orders. It’s an escape (or denial) from human...

Hanging up your goggles for an indefinite period is enough to strike terror into the heart of any swimmer. Yet as the saying goes, “Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it.” As athletes, we usually counter obstacles by going the extra mile, working harder, agonizing over technique. But since the outbreak of COVID-19, many sports—often a source of pleasure, camaraderie, and positive mental health—have been off-limits, leaving many of us feeling like fish out of water. The good news is that learning to refocus will not only help you stay sane during quarantine, it will also make you a better, more resilient athlete when you return to the ocean.  The spread of COVID-19 has been scary. Life right now is anything but normal. Quite aside from the disruption to your training, there’s every chance you’re feeling anxious and stressed, which will leave you...

While much of the world has come to a screeching halt, many of us are finding our lives disrupted in unimaginable ways. Ever evolving restrictions continue to emerge on what we can and can’t do. And the refuge of the outdoors and all of its healing powers are off limits in certain areas. We’ve seen open spaces such as parks and beaches closing around the world, and leaders demanding we stay indoors so we can flatten the curve. It’s a trying time for everyone, especially for the men and women on the front lines fighting the COVID-19 virus. It’s also no doubt a trying time for those of us that rely on the outdoors for balance in our lives. Indeed, the ability to escape into the sea or the woods may not be an accessible option for some of us at this point.  So what are we to do? As with everything, there...